Gig Review by Emily Stockham / Gig Photos by Jordan Curtis Hughes

King Krule

Fred Perry has always had a unique relationship with British subcultures over the last 6 decades. Once a notable symbol for sport it is now firmly placed on the shoulders of those who frequent the coolest gigs in town. Fred Perry undoubtedly represent heritage- but they’re also at the forefront of the up and coming too.

The bi-monthly Fred Perry Sub-Sonic Live series took place at The Garage in Islington on Friday night.

They presented selection of artists and DJs who are pushing things forward with some of the most exciting and fresh sounds on the scene.

As revellers spilled into The Garage ready to kick off the bank holiday weekend they were greeted by the electro sounds of Night Works.

Night Works

These guys seemed to be banging out indie-disco that wouldn’t have been out of place in the early-noughties. With frontman being a former Metronomy member they clearly have a focussed sound but failed to rouse much of an atmosphere- however they were in the dubious position of first band of the night, which is usually when everyone is stocking up at the bar. Night Works needs the song writing and vocals to catch up with their glossy pop-funk sound before they edge up to the headline slot.

Night Works

Second guest was the suitably sweet, Arlissa.

Arlissa

Her vocal warbles are strong and captivating- they wouldn’t sound out of place on a Marina and the Diamonds album, and there are glimmers of Forence and the Machine too. Yet, her onstage persona was girlish and mildly awkward which in fact made her entirely even more appealing. Her stand out track is undoubtedly ‘Sticks and Stones’. Arlissa’s soulful vocals means that she can span a variety of genres giving her an eclectic sound. She’s tipped as one to watch of 2013 and it’s easy to see why. To present her as the average urban artist is misleading- and definitely does the talented young singer a disservice. She is capable and diverse- which is probably why she is so hotly tipped for 2013- even at a time when potential young superstars are surfacing from the UK- and typically from London- by the bucket load.

Arlissa

Arlissa is undeniably an indie come RnB artist with the talent to straddle both genres and mix them up to create something fresh. The hype surrounding her is testament to her vocal talent, which has only been heard in short supply, because as of yet there is very little official content out there.

As the room finally filled to the brim the crowd were positively riled, waiting with baited breath for the affectionately named, ‘hoodie with a heart’ King Krule. It seems that everyone in venue has come to see the show specifically to hear King Krule- a mixture of die-hard hipster fans and everyone else wondering if he lives up to his current buzz in the music industry.

King Krule

The crowd sang along to King Krule’s past releases, and eagerly took in new material showcased at the event. With unprocessed, allusive lyrics, and a sound blending stripped-down elements of dubstep, experimental indie and jazz, his sound is bound to be popular.

The loveable thug with a penchant for telling it how it is and putting the world to right with a guitar and anguish laden lyrics seems to always strike a chord amongst the young musical crowd. Whilst there are similarities to Jamie T and Pete Doherty Krule lacks the charisma to support his teen angst and some of his 2-minute ditties fall short of making a real impact. Although at the tender and gangly age of 18 he clearly has room to mature and develop his sound.

King Krule

King Krule is a hit with all that is cool in 2013 which is no stain on his talent but may place a time marker on his longevity- he’s likely to be swiftly traded for the next cool troubadour of acoustic- indie-rap. For the time being though the beanie-hat and Nike Air Max clad crowds are hailing him as the prince of painful indie-pop and his lyrics and determination are good enough to let him transform from prince to King in no time.

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